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Anubis Photo paper poster

$ 14.50-$ 33.00 $ 10.15-$ 23.10

Anubis is the Greek name for a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion. In the oldest myths, Anubis is depicted as a protector of graves and cemeteries, but in later beliefs, he became the lord of the underworld, as Hermes was of higher space. The most famous myth involving Anubis is his contribution to the resurrection of Osiris. He was identified by his followers wearing a black or blue collar around his neck or holding a leash connected to nothing (because he led the dead down into darkness). Grab Anubis God of the Underworld Photo paper poster today for your home office!

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Anubis God of the Underworld Photo paper poster

Anubis is one of the most famous Egyptian gods, known for his jackal-like head and his role as a judge and guide to the dead. But Anubis played a vital role in Egyptian society beyond death — he was also involved in protecting mummified remains before they were buried, he was honored alongside Osiris in one of Egypt’s most popular festivals, and he even had his own cult following. If you’re interested in learning more about this ancient god, check out this article on Anubis!

Who is Anubis – Introduction to the Ancient God Anubis

Anubis is the god of death, afterlife, embalming, funeral, and cemeteries. He was the most important and powerful god of the dead and was usually depicted as a canine or a man with the head of a canine. He was often depicted with the head of a jackal, which was also representative of his protection of the deceased. The term “Anubis cult” is derived from two Greek words: “anos, meaning ‘death’, and ‘boreas, meaning ‘jumper’.” This ancient god was worshipped alongside numerous other Egyptian gods, including Rā, Hathor, Ra, and Anu, tracing his origin back to the past few millennia before Christ. Anubis was thought to be one of several Egyptian gods related to the concept of mummification, the telling of the tales of the dead via embalming. Thus, early Egyptologists thought that Anubis was one of a trio of gods who represented the mummification process: Serqet, Serpent, and Shamhat, also known collectively as Serpents of Death. They were closely related and worshipped alongside Anubis. But this is not the only reason why he was so closely linked with mummification practices; his name also represents another aspect of mummification: embalming. The Egyptian word “Anpem” means both “protecting bodies”, as well as the process of preserving people’s body parts post-death. Because mummification was often truncated or omitted in Egyptian culture and religions, it seems that Anubis was the one god to whom the Egyptians delegated mummification. Despite being tied closely with the process of mummification, Anubis was also closely associated with funerals — as with many Egyptian gods, Anubis was often depicted with the head of a jackal to indicate that he was to be a protector during life, and one who accompanied the deceased on his or her journey to the afterlife.

 

 A bit of background on the god Anubis, what he looked like, and what he did

Anubis was a jackal-headed god who helped people on their journey into the afterlife. He was one of the most significant gods in ancient Egypt. He was the god of mummification and helped to prepare the dead for their journey into the afterlife. Anubis was also the protector of the dead. It was believed that if a mummified body stayed in the ground long enough, it would return to life as a jackal. This was to ensure that the dead got to see their own reflection in the lake of coming-to-life…though the process wasn’t instant. The mummified body would need time to rebuild the muscles, skin, and other tissue to become the real thing again. Anubis was often depicted as a human/jaguar-like creature with a jackal head, which gave him the name of ‘Anubis of the land.’ Much like the jackal masks we see nowadays, they were created to protect people from dangerous situations. As far as we know, he usually hadn’t one, but two flanking animal heads. These were used to charge their chakras, give the strength of their weapons, and mimic the plumpness of jackal cheeks. Anubis was often depicted as a lion with a human/jackal torso, though it is also possible that different descriptions of Anubis referred to different beings with two arms. Due to the importance of his role in Egyptian religion, many myths were created around Anubis in order to explain his origin, behavior, and behavior with mummies. Anubis was depicted with human-like ears, the head of a jackal or lion, and two feathered stumps. The first one in front of him would deliver his judgment, while the second one’s tail often represented his ministry as a guide to the dead towards their final resting place. After they finished their travels, Anubis’ discarded stumps would regrow back to regrow and grow into a new jackal-headed creature. On his chest was a band intended to protect his heart, which would then give off magical signs in order to aid the deceased on their journey.

 

Interesting facts about Anubis that you might not have known

In Egyptian mythology, Anubis is the jackal-headed god of mummification and the afterlife. He was also the god of embalming, and he prepared the bodies of the deceased for burial. Anubis is typically depicted as a man with a black jackal-like head and ears, black skin, and wearing a white cloth wrapped around his waist. According to one account, he lived in a realm separate from that of the living and was forced to live alongside them. Anubis, commonly referred to as God of Death, was worshiped by Egyptian families who had great-grandchildren on the deceased’s other side. Anubis may have appeared in different forms throughout different time periods, but he is most commonly depicted as a jackal-headed man with blue eyes and a long face. He often wore a golden headdress and a sash around his waist. Indigenous communities in Egypt came to believe that apart from their visitations from the afterlife, the mummified body was unable to return to life until they touched and kissed Anubis’ face. On several occasions when the deceased was being prepared, people believed that they had to kiss the mummified person to return life to their body. According to another account, Anubis was worshipped first as a god of embalming and then of the afterlife. He became a god of justice after the biblical tale of the Garden of Eden and was even used as the basis for a script for a decided trial. On certain occasions when there was a need to settle a dispute among the deceased, the accused would approach Anubis and ask him to decide whether they would be freed or condemned to stand outside in the sand until their hearts stopped. If the gods agreed that they would be released, the accused would kiss the mummified body of Anubis to achieve their freedom and the moment would never come again. The Ancient Egyptian concept of the afterlife is remarkably simple. The deceased made their way to the west, where they would spend the remainder of their life looking back at the past.

 

 A look into some of the different myths about Anubis

The most well-known myth about Anubis is that he was the god of embalming and that he would guard the scales of judgment in the afterlife. Though the idea that he ensured the souls of the dead would be placed on the correct path has been traced back as far as the seventh century B.C., this was probably only a theory surrounding mummies. In fact, it wasn’t until the 19th century that it became clear that we were dealing with a different god altogether. On St. Catherine’s Day in 1822, a group of Italian scientists observed that the embalming process caused many of the bodies in the tombs to decompose very quickly. They concluded that Anubis came to life during the lengthy process of mummification and that he remained with the embalmed body until it was re-mummified and placed in the tomb alongside it. This also explains how the embalmed body would remain very protected during the transit through the ether after death. His great importance in the Greek pantheon is clear, but like all the other Egyptian gods, Anubis is loosely linked to the three major fathers: Bast, Seth, and Amen. Alongside watching over Egypt’s spiritual queen, Bast holds the throne for the deceased. Most Bånin funerals returned a statue of Bast alongside the body, but in more ritual offerings, a solar disk or stela often accompanied a mummy. Seth, often depicted as a falcon perched on a rock, is often connected with imparting wisdom and life skills to the next generation, especially to the sons of the deceased. This is likely related to Seth being the father of Re, the sky god, and the son of Ra. He was often described as the caretaker and guide of the dead to ensure their journey through the underworld was a smooth one. Amen, the god of death and rebirth, is represented by the sphinx whose eyes open upon death.

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 What does the future hold for this ancient god?

People’s interest in ancient gods has been growing since the 1960s when the idea of the “Age of Aquarius” became a popular concept. The Age of Aquarius is a time of increased interest in spirituality, mysticism, and human consciousness. According to the Associated Press, this was at a time when people began to favor religious leaders like “Jesus of Nazareth” and Mohammed “of Arabia.” The religious fervor of the modern age has made ancient gods more visible. However, many of the ancient Norse gods became extinct long ago, likely to follow their own more spiritual lives on Earth. Still, you may also find varying interpretations of like gods and goddesses in popular culture today, in films, comic books, or video games. In fact, Zeus is a god of war, justice, death, and might — and he’s had a number of personalities throughout the years. He’s been depicted as a complete human being with many emotions, a romantic partner, classes, athletic abilities, and even the capacity to speak multiple languages. Gods with multiple personalities are a common trope in the world of fiction. Think of Napolean Bonaparte as having multiple characters corresponding to his various states of mind or Odysseus’ journey through the sea as encompassing multiple versions of his character. If there’s one common trait among these types of gods, it’s that they’re usually portrayed as extremely powerful. This is no accident, and these depictions give us a good idea of where our current tempters stand as well. Many older gods are portrayed as complex multi-faceted beings; if you’re disappointed that Odin still doesn’t have a pet, let’s ask ourselves why. Perhaps there’s a deeper meaning in these complex outsize gods. In the olden days, a single god might have had multiple conceptual symbols or names. However, if you line up all the established gods from the major pantheon of the time, it’s easy to see how their powers and abilities could feed into each other.

This poster has a partly glossy, partly matte finish and it’ll add a touch of sophistication to any room.

• 10 mil (0.25 mm) thick
• Slightly glossy
• Fingerprint resistant

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